Friday 30 January 2015




culled from:humanesociety.org

You know how it goes: Your pet decides that your new carpet's the perfect place to relieve himself. Or perhaps you walk into your bedroom and catch a whiff of something like amonia, or worse.
You're struck with visions of cleaning and cleaning but never getting rid of the stain and smell. And even if you do manage a thorough clean-up, you worry that your pet has developed a new bathroom habit that will be impossible to break. Don't despair—we can help you solve this problem.

Follow a master plan

First, determine which areas are soiled. Then clean those areas completely. As long as your pet can smell his personal scent, he'll continue to return to the "accident zone." And even if you can't smell traces of urine, your pet can, so you must be sure to remove (neutralize) that odor—this means following all the recommended cleaning steps. If you fail to completely clean the area, your re-training efforts will be useless.
Once it's clean, make the accident zone unattractive and/or unavailable to your pet and the appropriate "bathroom" area attractive.
Have your pet checked out by a veterinarian to rule out medical causes for the accident. When you are certain your pet is healthy, use positive reinforcement to re-train your cat or dog (or train your kitten or puppy) to eliminate in the proper place. There may have been a reason why your pet chose the wrong place to eliminate. Explore the training links at the bottom of the page to learn more; understanding your pet's motivations will make it easier to get him or her on the right track again.

How to find the soiled area

This may seem obvious, but in some cases the spot will have dried invisibly and be hard to locate. Follow these steps:
  • Use your nose to sniff out soiled areas.
  • Examine the suspect area closely to catch hard-to-find soiling. You might want to use a black light (which you can purchase at a home-supply store) to discover even old urine stains. Turn out all of the lights in the room; use the black light to identify soiled areas, and lightly outline the areas with chalk.

How to clean machine-washable items

Machine wash as usual, adding a one-pound box of baking soda to your regular detergent. It's best to air dry these items if possible. If you can still see the stain or smell the urine, machine wash the item again and add an enzymatic cleaner (available at pet supply stores) that breaks down pet-waste odors. Be sure to follow the manufacturer's directions carefully.
If your pet urinates or defecates on the sheets or blankets on a bed, then cover the bed with a vinyl, flannel-backed tablecloth when you begin the re-training period. It's machine washable, inexpensive and unattractive to your pet.

How to clean carpeted areas and upholstery

For "new" stains (those that are still wet):

  • Soak up as much of the urine as possible with a combination of newspaper and paper towels. The more fresh urine you can remove before it dries, especially from carpet, the easier it will be to remove the odor. Place a thick layer of paper towels on the wet spot, and cover that with a thick layer of newspaper. If possible, put newspaper under the soiled area as well. Stand on this padding for about a minute. Remove the padding, and repeat the process until the area is barely damp.
  • If possible, put the fresh, urine-soaked paper towel in the area where it belongs—your cat's litter box or your dog's designated outdoor "bathroom area." This will help remind your pet that eliminating isn't a "bad" behavior as long as it's done in the right place.
  • Rinse the "accident zone" thoroughly with clean, cool water. After rinsing, remove as much of the water as possible by blotting or by using a wet vac.

For stains that have already set:

  • Consider renting an extractor or wet vac to remove all traces of heavy stains in carpeting (get one from a local hardware store). This machine works much like a vacuum cleaner and is efficient and economical. Extracting/wet vac machines do the best job of forcing clean water through your carpet and then forcing the dirty water back out. When you use these machines or cleaners, carefully follow the instructions. Don't use any chemicals with these machines; they work much better with plain water.
  • Use a high-quality pet odor neutralizer once the area is really clean (available at pet supply stores). Be sure to read and follow the cleaner's directions for use, including testing the cleaner on a small, hidden portion of fabric first to be sure it doesn't stain.
  • Try any good carpet stain remover if the area still looks stained after it's completely dry from extracting and neutralizing.
  • Avoid using steam cleanersto clean urine odors from carpet or upholstery. The heat will permanently set the stain and the odor by bonding the protein into any man-made fibers.
  • Avoid using cleaning chemicals, especially those with strong odors such as ammonia or vinegar. From your pet's perspective, these don't effectively eliminate or cover the urine odor and may actually encourage your pet to reinforce the urine scent mark in that area.
  • Neutralizing cleaners won't work until you've rinsed every trace of the old cleaner from the carpet if you've previously used cleaners or chemicals of any kind on the area. Even if you haven't used chemicals recently, any trace of a non-protein-based substance will weaken the effect of the enzymatic cleaner. The cleaner will use up its "energy" on the old cleaners, instead of on the protein stains you want removed.
  • Your job will be more difficult if urine has soaked down into the padding underneath your carpet. In some cases, you may need to take the drastic step of removing and replacing that portion of the carpet and padding.

How to clean floors and walls

If the wood on your furniture, walls, baseboard or floor is discolored, the varnish or paint has reacted to the acid in the urine. You may need to remove and replace the layer of varnish or paint. If you do so, make sure the new product is safe for pets.
Employees at your local hardware or home improvement store can help you identify and match your needs with appropriate removers and replacements.
Washable enamel paints and some washable wallpapers may respond favorably to enzymatic cleaners. Read the instructions before you use these products. You should also test them in an invisible area.

How to re-train your pet

Once you've established that your pet is healthy, you can teach her where you want her to eliminate. The following links will help you:





culled from:goodhousekeeping.com

Not knowing the language hairstylists speak can result in stressful trips to the salon, not to mention terrible haircuts. To help you communicate with your stylist and get the best cut ever, we've deciphered the most common salon jargon.
1. Layers
Every cut falls under three categories: layered, one-length, or a combination of both, says celebrity hairstylist Dwayne Ross. Layers help lessen density and create movement. One-length cuts, on the other hand, add weight. To avoid confusion and hair mishaps, double-check with your stylist. Regardless of what terminology the stylist is using, Ross recommends always asking, "Will this technique create layers or remove them?"
2. Overdirecting
This is a cutting technique where hair is lifted and cut over the head to create extra body and volume, says Nick Penna Jr., owner and lead stylist of SalonCapri. Essentially, the end result is a ton of exaggerated layers. Think: shaggy, rockstar cuts, says Ross.
3. Thinning
Thinning is ideal for those with thick, dense tresses who want to eliminate bulkiness. By relying on thinning shears, the process creates super-fine layers and adds dimension, says Penna. To thin with regular shears, also known as "slithering," stylists slide an open set of scissors along the shaft.
RELATED: 5 Ways to Fight Frizzy Hair »
4. Cutting Line
This is a line that stylists determine for a particular hairstyle, and its angle corresponds with how close or far apart the layers will look, says Penna. "For example, when a stylist wants to create a layered look, he will use a vertical cutting line."
5. Weight Line
Like the name implies, this is the area in a cut that holds the most weight. Penna uses a blunt or bob cut as an example. "The weight line is at the end of the hair. But in a long layered cut, the weight line is the longest layer." If you feel that your weight line is too heavy, Penna suggests asking your stylist to blend it in with thinning shears. Another way to soften bluntness is to use "point cutting," a snipping technique that lops the ends at an angle to create a textured or feathered edge.
6. Graduated Hair (or Stacked Haircut)
A graduated cut involves layers, which for the hairstylist, means cutting at an angle of less than 90 degree. Thanks to this technique, there is more control for stylists to shape the desired outline of a cut. "With this look, the layers stack closely on top of another, often adding a bit of needed bulk or weight to the style in specific areas," adds Penna. 
7. Wedge Haircut
While a graduated cut requires a maximum angle of 90 degrees, a wedge haircut needs only 45, says Ross. "The hair at the nape of the neck is cut the shortest, with layers radiating out as they reach the crown of the head," adds Penna. With that, the ends are cut at multiple angles (versus a straight blunt edge) to boost volume and movement.
8. Blunt Cut
The blunt cut is lopped at an angle of 0 degrees, making each strand fall at one length, Ross says. Blunt cuts, often known as bob cuts, are better suited for fine-haired ladies since they create the illusion of density and volume.
9. Choppy
If texture is what you're looking for, consider a choppy look — a cut with short layers is typically for bobs or shoulder-length styles, says Penna.
10. Gamine
The literal French translation of 'gamine' is 'playful,' which is a fitting term to describe the "boyishly short and sassy hairstyle," says Penna, who points to Audrey Hepburn's iconic style as a prime example. Gamine also includes the pixie cut, which involves shorn sides and back with longer layers on top.



culled from:goodhousekeeping.com

1. It's way too long.
Über-long hair is a tough look for over-40 women. "I call it the '1661' — a woman's long hair makes her look 16 from the back, but from the front you see she is actually nearing retirement age," says Pantene celebrity hairstylist Danilo. A universally flattering length: to the collarbone. "A cut that grazes the collar and has face-framing layers also draws attention away from an aging neck," says Jet Rhys, a San Diego-based stylist.
2. Or it's way too short.
How short is too short? There's no rule, but keep in mind that the end point of your cut emphasizes the facial feature next to it, says Rhys. So if you're concerned about a sagging jawline, don't ask for a chin-length bob. And remember that a short 'do isn't an excuse to hang up your blow dryer. "Too many women think a short cut is a free pass to forgo styling, but when hair has no polish, it can look matronly," she says. Cropped styles are modern and youthful when they're smooth and sleek; if those qualities don't come naturally to your hair, use a frizz-fighter before styling.
3. You've worn the same cut for years.
Embrace change. "If you have the same 'do you had 10 years ago, it's time for a new look," says Nick Arrojo, owner of Arrojo Studio, NYC. "You're not wearing the same clothes — why have the same hair?" If you're leery of drastic change, take baby steps. "Something as simple as moving your part can update your look," says Rhys.

4. You're afraid to experiment with new ingredients.
A slew of anti-agers, like niacinamide and caffeine, are debuting in hair products. They offer cosmetic benefits, like smoothness, shine, and a generally more youthful appearance, says Jeni Thomas, Ph.D., of Proctor & Gamble R & D: "The hair cuticle is similar to the top layer of skin, so it makes sense that these ingredients will have beneficial effects on hair and skin." Try L'Oréal Paris Advanced Haircare Power Moisture Shampoo ($5, drugstores), with sodium hyaluronate, a common moisture-attracting skin-care ingredient.
5. Your color looks dull next to your skin.
Whether you hit the salon or take the DIY route, subtle tweaks to your color can make a huge difference. "A woman's complexion lightens and becomes more translucent as she ages, so what looked great when she was 25 may not look so good when she's 50," explains Arrojo. Think about the hair you had as a child, suggests Brad Johns, color director at the Salon & Spa at Saks Fifth Avenue, New York. "Go back to that color family, whether it was blond, brunette, or red. Anything monotone looks severe and aging, so add highlights and multiple tones throughout." When in doubt, err on the lighter side — dark hues create too harsh a contrast with paling skin.




culled from:.goodhousekeeping.com


Step #1: Let it air dry a bit.
Smoothing out hair that's about 30% dry is faster than tackling it sopping wet, says Alli Webb, cofounder of Los Angeles-based Drybar. So gently towel-dry — or even better, a T-shirt, which will help prevent frizz — apply a lotion or serum (see step #2), comb, and let hair air out for 10 minutes. In the meantime, you can go about your other morning routine. (But don't wait too long: Too-dry tresses resist manipulation.) Then start on your hairline to brush out any cowlicks.
Step #2: Rub on a smoother.
Any blow-dry lotion or serum will help achieve a sleek finish, usually with a dose of a smoothing silicone. But in consumer testing, the Good Housekeeping Institute found that Blow Ready Set Blow Express Blow Dry Lotion ($21, ulta.com), with polymers it claims distribute heat along the hair shaft, also shaved an average of three minutes off drying time.
Step #3: Swap out your brush.
Switch to a ceramic round-barreled brush. It conducts heat and will warm up under the hot airflow of your dryer, reducing blowout time, says Sean Jahanbigloo, co-owner of Juan Juan Salon in Los Angeles. "These brushes usually have fewer bristles than ones made of boar hair (often used for blowouts), allowing for more airflow."
Step #4: Use a strong dryer.
The motor in a professional blow-dryer is three to four times larger and produces more air (hence faster drying) than the one in a consumer model, says Leon Benz, director of marketing/product development at Conair. But they can run upwards of $200. For power on a leaner budget, JF1 John Frieda Full Volume Dryer ($33, amazon.com) has a slightly compact version of a pro motor.
Step #5: Do a semipro job.
"At the salon, we meticulously dry both the top side and the underside of each hair section, for a blowout that lasts for days," says stylist Shuki Almac, of New York City's Warren-Tricomi salon. To smooth tresses for just one day, use the nozzle attachment to focus the airflow on only the top of each section. And if you're super-rushed, brush downward with a paddle brush.




culled from:goodhousekeeping.com

Pushing yourself at the gym is hard. Just five minutes in, and we're ready to give up. And we know we're not alone. Well, it turns out all you have to do is change your attitude and you'll get better results. According to a study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, giving yourself a self-motivational pep talk can help you exercise harder and longer.
Researchers split 24 participants into two groups and studied them while they were cycling. The group that thought positively was able to reduce their rate of perceived exertion by 50%, meaning they were actually working harder than they thought. So the real secret to not hating your workout is all in your head. Which is a good thing because the American Heart Association recommends 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise each week, or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic exercise.
So the next time you're ready to quit, try saying "I can do this," or "I can feel my body changing already" to give yourself a little push. Or, even better, grab a friend and motivate each other.





culled from:http://www.success.com
Last month’s SUCCESS.com article on 10 things successful people never do again reminded me of Steve Jobs’ often-quoted philosophy about the importance of questioning yourself. “If today were the last day of my life, would I do what I’m about to do today?” It’s true: The most successful people have the ability to objectively evaluate themselves on a regular basis—their skills, their actions and their progress toward goals.

They don’t sleepwalk through the routine. They’re actively thinking about the things they do. But questioning yourself doesn’t mean second-guessing yourself. It means evaluating your status and objectives, and what you’ll do to reach them with a clear, unbiased mind. It’s a practice that will help make you think and become more successful in work and life.

Here are five simple questions that successful people ask themselves every day:

1. Am I in the right niche?

If you don’t have passion for your job, you won’t be motivated to overcome the natural barriers and obstacles that life puts in the way of success. And even if you started out with passion by the bucketful, that can fade. This is why it’s so important to routinely check in with yourself and your motivation. If you feel like your passion is waning and you’re burning out, a change may be necessary to reignite your energy for business. Finding a niche that sustains you emotionally will give you the clear mind and passionate drive you need to succeed.

2. Am I learning from my mistakes?

Most patterns of success include plenty of failure. That’s completely normal—even healthy. However, the important thing is that you’re learning and you’re rarely making the same mistake twice. When you hit a roadblock, take time to evaluate what went wrong, what needs to change, and how you can prevent it from happening in the future. Try to take a nugget of wisdom from each failure you encounter on your road to success.

3. Am I consistently pushing my own boundaries?

Success isn’t attained by driving the speed limit or sticking to the beaten path. You can rest assured that the people who do well in your industry are constantly pushing ahead and challenging their own boundaries. Creating new, more audacious goals and attempting to reach them will keep your passion ignited and keep you striving toward success. Push through professional barriers and always look to achieve the impossible.

4. What is my game plan?

While you are challenging yourself, you should also map out strategies that will allow you to become more efficient and precise. If you are trying to work faster and better, you need to develop routines and processes that allow you to do so. Sit down and create the physical map that will take you from where you are to where you want to go. Leave room for detours that could end up being shortcuts as you learn and grow.

5. Do I still believe I can do this?

The most important ingredient of success is the belief in yourself and what you’re striving toward. The highest ambitions are nothing without the conviction that you can actually reach them. Take a hard look in the mirror and ask yourself if your passion and drive match up with your aspirations. Skills and know-how are less than half the battle. If you don’t believe you can do it, it’ll be hard to convince anyone else you can. You have to be your own cheerleader before you can expect anyone else to be.
Last month’s SUCCESS.com article on 10 things successful people never do again reminded me of Steve Jobs’ often-quoted philosophy about the importance of questioning yourself. “If today were the last day of my life, would I do what I’m about to do today?” It’s true: The most successful people have the ability to objectively evaluate themselves on a regular basis—their skills, their actions and their progress toward goals.
They don’t sleepwalk through the routine. They’re actively thinking about the things they do. But questioning yourself doesn’t mean second-guessing yourself. It means evaluating your status and objectives, and what you’ll do to reach them with a clear, unbiased mind. It’s a practice that will help make you think and become more successful in work and life.
Here are five simple questions that successful people ask themselves every day:
1. Am I in the right niche?
If you don’t have passion for your job, you won’t be motivated to overcome the natural barriers and obstacles that life puts in the way of success. And even if you started out with passion by the bucketful, that can fade. This is why it’s so important to routinely check in with yourself and your motivation. If you feel like your passion is waning and you’re burning out, a change may be necessary to reignite your energy for business. Finding a niche that sustains you emotionally will give you the clear mind and passionate drive you need to succeed.
2. Am I learning from my mistakes?
Most patterns of success include plenty of failure. That’s completely normal—even healthy. However, the important thing is that you’re learning and you’re rarely making the same mistake twice. When you hit a roadblock, take time to evaluate what went wrong, what needs to change, and how you can prevent it from happening in the future. Try to take a nugget of wisdom from each failure you encounter on your road to success.
3. Am I consistently pushing my own boundaries?
Success isn’t attained by driving the speed limit or sticking to the beaten path. You can rest assured that the people who do well in your industry are constantly pushing ahead and challenging their own boundaries. Creating new, more audacious goals and attempting to reach them will keep your passion ignited and keep you striving toward success. Push through professional barriers and always look to achieve the impossible.
4. What is my game plan?
While you are challenging yourself, you should also map out strategies that will allow you to become more efficient and precise. If you are trying to work faster and better, you need to develop routines and processes that allow you to do so. Sit down and create the physical map that will take you from where you are to where you want to go. Leave room for detours that could end up being shortcuts as you learn and grow.
5. Do I still believe I can do this?
The most important ingredient of success is the belief in yourself and what you’re striving toward. The highest ambitions are nothing without the conviction that you can actually reach them. Take a hard look in the mirror and ask yourself if your passion and drive match up with your aspirations. Skills and know-how are less than half the battle. If you don’t believe you can do it, it’ll be hard to convince anyone else you can. You have to be your own cheerleader before you can expect anyone else to be.
- See more at: http://www.success.com/article/5-simple-questions-successful-people-ask-themselves-every-day#sthash.mY2boJg1.dpuf




culled from:goodhousekeeping.com


Turkey is always top of mind for trainer La's fancy clientele, and not the delicious golden bird you eat on Thanksgiving. Nope — women flock to her for help with "turkey wings," a.k.a. pesky arm-jiggle. This set of smart, effective exercises designed by La will help firm triceps and biceps, and burn any fat that's hiding your hard work. For best results, do this circuit twice, three times a week.
Move #1: Curl
What it works: Biceps
Choose a band with handles for the easiest grip. Typically, yellow means light resistance, green is medium, and red is heavy. Stagger feet, right in front of left, with band under front foot; hold a band handle at each side. Bring hands toward shoulders. Return to start for one rep; do 15 reps. Make sure to keep your elbows locked at your sides. Amp it up by placing feet hip-width apart on band to increase intensity.

Move #2: Extension
What it works: Triceps
Place both band handles in left hand at left hip and hold the band's loose end in right hand (wrapping it around hand); pull band until taut. Next, stagger your stance, right foot in front of left. Keeping right hand steady, bend left arm until forearm is parallel to floor. Return to start; do 15 reps. Switch sides; repeat. Keep your chest lifted and your abs engaged. If you're feeling wiped, unwrap the band one time to ease tension.

Move #3: Arm Circle Jack
What it works: Shoulders, and counts as cardio
Stand with feet wider than hip-width apart, arms out to sides at shoulder height. Quickly draw small arm circles in the air as you jump feet in and out jumping jack–style. Keep it up for 30 seconds. Go easy by stepping one foot at a time out to sides, or pick up your pace to boost the calorie burn.



culled from:goodhousekeeping.com









culled from:success.com
In my book Make Waves: Be the One to Start Change at Work and in Life, I share that Wave Makers (people who started a change in their organizations, communities or the marketplace) have Idea Partners. These are people around them who help shape their plans, influence their direction and tell them what they don’t know or can’t see. Idea Partners help them learn.

That learning can’t happen through a generic LinkedIn request or superficial email. As much as we are dependent upon technology and media, nothing can replace the conversation for gaining insight.

Allen Stephenson, a Wave Maker in my book, founded Southern Tide apparel company when he was a college student. I had so many questions: How did he know what to do when he was such a novice? With no experience in apparel or running a business, how did he have the confidence and knowledge to make the right decisions and achieve such success? What were the first steps that got him started?

So he shared how he spent the first few months of his new business: “I talked to people who used to own apparel manufacturing companies, financial people and so many others. I was taking people out to lunch like crazy—every day, three, four or five people. And some of them are still involved today. I didn’t, and still don’t, know how to do all this stuff, but I did know how to say, ‘This is the vision, the dream. We’re going to do this and make clothes in the way that I’m imagining, and we can do this together.’”

These coffees and lunches created Stephenson’s path for learning how to grow his business—and for forming essential long-term relationships. He met dozens and dozens of people as he discovered how to develop his vision. And each meeting added to his knowledge and direction.

Here are six tips for turning a simple coffee or meal into a helpful and meaningful career-boosting connection:

1. Share why you value that person’s input. Most people are totally willing to offer advice and help others, as long as time allows. It helps if, when you ask to get coffee, you tell them why you value their experience and knowledge. Maybe you want to emulate their career or you want to create a business like theirs—just reveal to them why their perspective is so important to you.

2. Treat the get-together as a relationship starter, not an information grab. No one likes to feel that they are part of an impersonal transaction or that a latte is being exchanged for a strategic introduction. Find common ground and get to know each other before anything else.

3. Be specific. If you ask for time to meet, let them know exactly what you are looking for and why. Explain that you would like their advice on how to find the right investors, make a move from IT to sales or write your first book—whatever it might be. This information helps ensure that even a short coffee is productive.

4. Be helpful. Remember your goal should be a relationship and business friendship, not a one-time transaction. Look for ways you can support them, too. Even small gestures can help define that it’s a two-way relationship.

5. Say thank you. People have to carve out room in their schedules to meet for coffee or lunch, so it’s essential to show that you genuinely appreciate the time taken and advice given. After thanking them in person, send a follow-up note afterward, or even a favorite book you think they would enjoy, to further express your gratitude and continue to grow the bond.

6. Stay in touch. A quick story to illustrate my point: I met Georgia when she was a senior in college through a business colleague, simply because she had a degree in my field. After we met, she’d send short emails with quick updates on her internship and then her first job. She called occasionally and asked for quick advice about an upcoming decision or conversation. She always respected my time, and her friendly check-ins created a lasting relationship, one that started with a Skype chat and then coffee. Rather than treating those as information transactions while looking for her first job, Georgia worked on the relationship, seeing it as something more valuable—and we still keep in touch today.

As you kick off ideas for a new business or redirect your career, remember that a latte treated with special care can become much more than a quick chat at Starbucks.





Albert Einstein


culled from:forbes.com

If you had to guess, what would you say investor Warren Buffett and civil rights activist Rosa Parks had in common? How about Charles Darwin, Al Gore, J.K. Rowling, Albert Einstein, Mahatma Gandhi and Google’s Larry Page? They are icons. They are leaders. And they are introverts.
Despite the corporate world’s insistence on brazen confidence–Speak up! Promote yourself! Network!—one third to half of Americans are believed to be introverts, according to Susan Cain, author of just released Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking. She contends that personality shapes our lives as profoundly as gender and race, and where you fall on the introvert-extrovert spectrum is the single most important aspect of your personality.
Introverts may make up nearly half the population, but Cain says they are second-class citizens.
“A widely held, but rarely articulated, belief in our society is that the ideal self is bold, alpha, gregarious,” says Cain. “Introversion is viewed somewhere between disappointment and pathology.”
The terms “introvert” and “extrovert” were first made popular by psychologist Carl Jung in the 1920s and then later by the Myers-Briggs personality test, used in major universities and corporations. By Cain’s definition, introverts prefer less stimulating environments and tend to enjoy quiet concentration, listen more than they talk and think before they speak. Conversely, extroverts are energized by social situations and tend to be assertive multi-taskers who think out loud and on their feet.
It was over the last century, says Cain, that society began reshaping itself as an extrovert’s paradise—to the introvert’s demise. She explains that before the twentieth century, we lived in what historians called a “culture of character,” when you were expected to conduct yourself morally with quiet integrity. But when people starting flocking to the cities and working for big businesses the question became, how do I stand out in a crowd? We morphed into a “culture of personality,” which she says sparked a fascination with glittering movie stars, bubbly employees and outgoing leadership.
In the last few decades, this “Extrovert Ideal” has transformed workplaces, says Cain. Independent, autonomous work that favored employee privacy was eroded and practically replaced by what she calls “The New Groupthink,” which “elevates teamwork above all else.” Children now learn in groups. Ideas are formed in brainstorming sessions. Talkers are considered smarter. Employees are hired for “people skills,” and offices are designed to be open and interactive.
Yet, according to Cain, it’s only worked to damage innovation and productivity. Research shows that charismatic leaders earn bigger paychecks but do not have better corporate performance; that brainstorming results in lower quality ideas and the more vocally assertive extroverts are the most likely to be heard; that the amount of space allotted to each employee shrunk 60% since the 1970s; and that open office plans are associated with reduced concentration and productivity, impaired memory, higher turnover and increased illness.
If we all lose in this situation, introverts lose more—with skills that are more likely to be overlooked and underappreciated. “Introverts living under the Extrovert Ideal are like women living in a man’s world,” says Cain. “Our most important institutions are designed for extroverts. We have a waste of talent.”
Cain is not seeking introvert domination. She acknowledges that big ideas and great leadership can come from either personality type. What she wants is a better balance and inclusion of different work styles. “In most job interviews, people say they are looking for people skills and emotional intelligence,” notes Cain. “That’s reasonable, but the question is, how do you define what that looks like?”
Furthermore, she believes that extroverted and introverted leaders excel in different areas and can learn from each other. Studies show that introverts are better at leading proactive employees because they listen to and let them run with their ideas. Meanwhile, extroverts are better at leading passive employees because they have a knack for motivation and inspiration.
While extroverted leaders could learn from their counterparts to take a more careful approach to risk and let others speak up, Cain says introverted leaders need to push themselves to be more social. She offers John Lilly, former CEO of Mozilla, as an example. He would force himself to walk the halls and make eye contact because he hadn’t realized how much it offended people when he didn’t greet them.
Ultimately, Cain believes, as a society, we are starving for stillness and need to turn down the noise. “It’s a very powerful thing to be quiet and collect your thoughts.”




culled from:goodhousekeeping.com

You need: A pair of three- to eight-pound weights (yoga mat optional).
Step #1: Do 2 sets of these moves in order, three days a week on alternate days.
Step #2: Add 10 to 20 minutes of your favorite cardio at least twice a week.


Move #1: The Skier Swing
What it works: You glutes, hamstrings, and hips.
Stand with feet hip-width apart, knees bent slightly, a dumbbell in each hand.
A. Push hips back and bring dumbbells slightly behind you.
B. Quickly thrust hips forward, squeezing glutes as you swing dumbbells to shoulder height. Repeat for 12 reps total.


Move #2: The Triceps Bridge
What it works: Your triceps, glutes, back, and abs.
Holding a dumbbell in each hand, lie on your back with knees bent, feet flat. Bend elbows so weights are on either side of your head, elbows pointed toward the ceiling. Simultaneously contract glutes and raise hips as you extend arms so weights are directly above chest. Return to start for one rep; repeat for 12 reps total.


Move #3: The Kneeling Wood Chop
What it works: Your abs, obliques, and shoulders.
A. Kneel on right knee, holding a dumbbell with both hands at right thigh.
B. Slowly bring the weight across your body and over your left shoulder, looking at hands. Hold briefly, then return to start for one rep. Do 12 reps, then switch sides.


Move #4: The Lunge and Fly
What it works: Your legs and back.
Start with feet hip-width apart, holding a dumbbell in each hand, palms inward.
A. Step back with right foot into a lunge, hinging forward at hips.
B. Draw arms out to sides as you squeeze shoulder blades together. Holding the lunge, continue for 12 reps; switch sides and repeat.


Move #5: The Sumo Press
What it works: Your glutes, arms, and quads.
Stand with feet wide, toes turned out, holding dumbbells at shoulders, elbows bent.
A. Bend knees and squat deeply.
B. As you stand, press weights overhead until arms are straight. Return to start for one rep. Do 12 reps.


Move #6: Seal Jacks
What it works: Your chest, shoulders, and back, and counts as cardio.
A. Start with feet wide, arms straight out to the sides at shoulder height.
B. Jump, bringing feet together as you clap hands in front of chest. Jump back to starting position. Continue for 30 to 45 seconds.



culled from:goodhousekeeping.com






The Plan

When it comes to weight loss, following a healthy diet is only the beginning. Cardio and strength exercises are crucial, which is why we've created a plan to help you get started.
Three times a week, do the six-exercise workout outlined here. This will build up the muscles most responsible for fat burning, and banish belly fat. Do each exercise as many times as possible. After you've finished all six moves, repeat the whole cycle once more.

 
Strengthens: Quadriceps
Sit on the floor with your legs flat in front of you. Then bend your right leg and wrap both hands around that knee to help keep your back straight. With your left leg straight, lift it as high as you can, hold for a second and lower slowly. Your foot should be flexed. Repeat as many times as you can, then switch to the opposite leg and do the same number of repetitions.

 

Push-Up Pride, Starting Position

Strengthens: Chest
Kneel on the floor, facedown, resting on your knees and hands. Your back and arms should be straight.


Push-Up Pride, The Move

Lower your body until your chest nearly touches the floor, hold and then slowly push back up. Repeat as many times as you can.

 

Leg Drop, Starting Position

Strengthens: Abs
Lie on your back with your legs in the air, bent so that your calves are parallel to the floor.

 

Leg Drop, The Move

Slowly lower your heels down, tap the floor, and lift back up. Keep your back flat on the mat. Repeat as many times as you can.

 

X Crunch, Starting Position

Strengthens: Upper abs
Lie on your back, knees bent, feet on the floor. Cross your arms behind your head, with your fingers touching your shoulders.


 

X Crunch, The Move

Use your stomach muscles to lift torso up and to lower it down (at first, you may barely be able to lift at all — just keep trying). To keep from overarching your neck, pretend there's a tennis ball your under your chin. Repeat as many times as you can.

 

Invisible Chair

Strengthens: Legs
Stand near a wall with your feet hip-width apart. Slowly lower your body as if you were sitting down in an invisible chair. Lean your back against the wall. Your hands should be lightly resting on your knees. Hold the position for as long as you can (which might be only 10 seconds at first; work up to 60).

 

Superman

Strengthens: Lower back
Lie flat on your stomach, stretching your arms out in front of you. Then lift your arms and legs off the ground, hold for a second and lower. Repeat as many times as you can.






culled from:forbes.com
“Women are the majority of the population but still a minority voice,” says Christine Jahnke, a speech coach and the author of The Well-Spoken Woman. She’s worked with some of the most powerful women in the nation, advising Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign and Michelle Obama’s first international speech, to help them command authority in any setting.
While Jahnke’s tips are generally gender-neutral, professional women may want to pay particular attention: Naturally high voices tend to make you seem younger, says Jahnke, so “some women may be starting a couple steps behind.” Whether you hope to ace a meeting, improve your presentation skills or project more power and authority when speaking with business associates, Jahnke offers the following guidelines.
Take ownership of the room.
According to Jahnke, speaking from a place of strength and authority is mostly a mental game. “Once you are in the room, recognize that you belong there,” she says, noting that women often approach meetings and presentations as if they’re being tested. When you feel confident and comfortable, it’s infectious. Furthermore, Jahnke cautions against avoidant behaviors like sitting in the back, hiding behind furniture and keeping your head down.
Stand like a champion.
“Giving presentations and making speeches is very physical,” says Jahnke. When on stage or standing before a group of people, she advises using the champion stance: position one foot in front of the other, place your weight on the back foot, hold your head up, drop your shoulders back, lean your torso slightly forward and smile.
Sit with your elbows on the table.
When sitting down, Jahnke counters your mother’s advice: Get your elbows on the table. “Don’t put just your hands on the table; it looks too lady-like,” she warns. Instead, sit up straight, lean forward and place your forearms on the table-top. Whether in person or on camera, maintain eye contact with fellow speakers or the camera lens.
Tailor your message to the audience.
When approaching a presentation, says Jahnke, a common mistake is asking: What am I going to say? Instead, she advises considering: What does my audience need to hear, and how much do they know about my topic? Melinda Gates, co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, is especially good at understanding her audience and telling stories in a way that transports them to remote parts of the world, so that they can experience and visualize philanthropy’s impact.
Get to the point.
“Your competition is the attention span,” Jahnke says. Rambling, unfocused speeches will earn you few supporters. A powerful presentation stays on message, is made up of short sentences and few asides, and gets to the point quickly.
Slow down and breathe.
When PepsiCo chief Indra Nooyi first travelled from India to the U.S. to attend the Yale School of Management, she spoke so fast that she barely paused to breathe. Nooyi had to learn a slower, more effective pace that leant more authority to her ideas. Jahnke says that broadcasters usually speak at a pace of 150 words per minute, which is conversational yet metered.
Utilize your vocal tools.
“The worst thing you could do is drone on using a flat monotone with no variance in pitch or pace,” cautions Jahnke. She believes the voice is one of the most underused tools and can be manipulated to project power and incite interest. Optimize it by using a mid-range pitch, inflection to offer emphasis and variety, a volume that attracts attention but is not overly loud, pauses after important sentiments and clear pronunciation so that words are not lost.
Cut out fill-in words.
Ums, uhs, hms, you knows and likes will dilute your message and undermine your power. These “fill in” words may make you seem nervous, unprepared or unfocused. Oftentimes people use them because they are afraid of dead space, but in fact a pause is more powerful, says Jahnke.
Inject humor and warmth.
Female leaders like IMF chief Christine Lagarde and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg are excellent examples of women who are articulate and well-spoken but also utilize humor to connect with the audience. They project an ease and optimism that invites in listeners and establishes credibility.
Let go of self-doubt.
“Be Tina Fey–not Liz Lemon,” says Jahnke. Trusting in yourself and in the importance of what you have to say goes a long way in gaining the same trust of others. Fey’s 30 Rock alter ego Liz Lemon is plagued by self-doubt and self-consciousness that weakens her authority. Jahnke suggests building confidence by finding opportunities to practice your speaking skills, be it volunteering to be a panel moderator or giving a speech at a social or family gathering. “Get better by thinking about the little stuff.”


culled from:about.com
Some of the world's most famous and profitable businesses were started by students. Microsoft began in Bill Gates' Harvard dorm room, Google got its start on the Stanford campus as the computer science project of doctoral students Sergey Brin and Larry Page and thousands of other student companies thrive in every industry.
Even if you're not aiming to be another Bill Gates - maybe you just want to earn some extra cash with a summer landscaping business - you'll have to navigate some unique challenges as a young entrepreneur testing the business waters. Here are 10 success tips for young entrepreneurs.
1. Do what you love.
All successful teen businesses have one factor in common: Their owners love what they do - so choose a small business idea that aligns with your interests, no matter what they are.
2. Know what you want.
Are you willing to leave school if your business takes off? Or do you envision your business as a side project? Being able to answer questions like these will help you organize your time and priorities.
3. Be radical...
In your late teens and early 20s, your thinking is fresh, original and full of energy. Don't be afraid to try something no one's ever done, create an off-the-wall product or shake up an existing market by changing factors (such as a service or delivery model) that established companies take for granted.
4. ... but follow the rules.
Being a young entrepreneur doesn't exempt you from registering your business, keeping records and paying taxes. Following these simple rules now will save you from legal and administrative headaches later.
5. Manage your time.
Running a business while going to school is stressful and difficult. Understand what is required of you in your separate roles as a student and a business owner, and employ planning and organizational tools - for example, a well-maintained appointment book, Microsoft Outlook or an online time/project management system - to make the most of your time.
6. Use school resources.
Being a student isn't a handicap in business; on the contrary, it can be an advantage. Your campus offers free computers and Internet connectivity, a host of potential employees and/or volunteers and the expertise of professors who would be happy to share their knowledge and experience with you. You're literally surrounded by people and resources, so make the most of your situation.
7. Find a mentor.
Buddy up with a local entrepreneur or business leader with a record of achievement to be your small business mentor. Your mentor will help you understand the risks and challenges of business, provide a sounding board for your ideas and help you find investors for your company.
8. Exploit online resources.
Your computer can connect you to hundreds of online resources for young entrepreneurs. Immerse yourself in these resources; they'll help to inspire, direct and motivate you.
9. Be good to yourself.
Regardless of how organized and enthusiastic you are, some days will overwhelm you. Don't be afraid to step back from work and do whatever relaxes you. Whether it's the endorphin rush of exercise, the lively company of good friends or a quiet day of meditation on the beach, take advantage of opportunities to invigorate yourself and balance your responsibilities with relaxation.
10. Check your mentality.
One of the problems that can afflict young entrepreneurs is a mental block against, as Nike might say, just doing it. We've all been raised on stories of Internet billionaires, wealthy young actors and other tales of spectacular overnight success. Knowing how well other people have done in business and how quickly they've scaled the mountain is demotivating. It can make some young entrepreneurs lose confidence and feel as if they don't want to get started on a business unless it's going to be the next YouTube.
This is a self-defeating mentality. Combat it by reminding yourself that you're not competing against anyone but yourself. Do whatever it is that you can do today, whether that means tutoring, designing T-shirts or building online communities. The important thing is to get your feet wet - not to take over the business world.
The bottom line is that your student days are ripe with entrepreneurship opportunities. You may never again have the energy, resources or motivation to start your business, so get to work.



culled from:.goodhousekeeping.com

Whether you're planning your first 5K or like to go on nature walks, there's a sneaker for you. But the process of finding the right pair can be daunting. Besides fit and quality, most of us also want shoes that look good, which means you really have to do your research before hitting the stores. So we talked to a few experts to find out what missteps you should avoid.
1. You buy the wrong size and style for your foot.
"One common mistake is letting another person tell you what shoes are best for you," says Dr. Lowell Weil Jr., D.P.M. and President of the Weil Foot and Ankle Institute in Chicago. The most important thing you can do is try them on, pace around the store, and continue trying on new pairs until you find something that feels good for you.
Another mistake? You buy a shoe that's slightly too tight with the thinking that it will stretch out over time. "That typically doesn't work," Weil warns. Make sure the shoe fits you well in the store. You might also consider visiting a podiatrist ahead of time to find out what your specific foot needs are — they can help you understand the type of shoe that is best for you.
2. You don't consider the activities you'll be doing.
"Pretty much any activity that someone wants do to, there's going to be a shoe out there," says Doug Smiley, the Running Footwear Business Unit Manager for Mizuno. "Whether you're going to be running, walking, or playing tennis, from an injury prevention perspective it's important to pick a shoe that's specific to the activity."
Plus, many people don't think about one of the most important basics: the sole. "A quality supportive shoe usually has a sole that is somewhat difficult to bend and has a slight heel to it," says Weil. And, if you're wearing everyday sneakers to go for a run, your sole will be compromised much faster.

3. You don't communicate with or question the sales person.
According to Weil, there are a few key things you should know before stepping into the shoe store:
• The types of shoes that have worked for you in the past
• Whether you have a wide or narrow foot
• Kinds of foot problems you've had, such as blisters, arch and heel pain, bunions, or hammertoes
• If your feet or ankles swell throughout the day
• Injury history or any joint pain in your ankles, knees, and hips
Knowing whether you have problems will make you a more educated shopper because you can more easily identify which shoes can and can't work.
If you're searching for a walking or running specific shoe, Smiley suggests checking out a specialty running store where a specialist can monitor your gait and form when you run. "There might be an intimidation there, and though they are selling shoes, it's all about the service," he says. "Huge portions of people who shop at these stores are walkers or people who are new to running and need to get fitted."
4. You keep switching brands.
"If you find a brand that works for you, stick with them," says Weil. Most companies are consistent in the way they make their shoes, so you can usually count on them selling one or two pairs that will work for your foot. Unless the design drastically changes, it will be better for you in the long run to always buy a brand you really like.
5. You don't replace your shoes often enough.
Both Weil and Smiley agree — everyone is different and the timing of when you need to change your shoe varies from person to person. However, a good rule of thumb for both runners and everyday shoe wearers is to replace your shoes after 400 miles.
Other things to look out for? Check the sides and bottoms of your shoes to see if they're leaning or more worn down. And if you start to feel pain in your feet, legs, knees, hips, or back, it means your sneakers aren't providing adequate support anymore.





culled from:goodhousekeeping.com


1. Boost your memory.
Lifting for just 20 minutes may improve memory by 10%, found a new study from Georgia Tech. Researchers think temporarily stressing muscles using bags, dumbbells, machines, or your own body weight releases hormones that benefit memory. So strength training right after trying to memorize something could make you more likely to retain that info.
2. Sleep better.
A new study from Appalachian State University concluded that the best time to do cardio is in the morning, and the best time to do a little bit of weight training is in the afternoon or early evening. Researchers determined that resistance training warms your body up, which primes you for a night of sound sleep. And, a combo of both cardio and strength training can help you fall asleep faster and sleep longer throughout the night. Sign us up!
3. Speed up your metabolism.
Contrary to popular belief, when you exercise you aren't actually replacing fat with muscle mass. Yes, as you lift weights and exercise more often, you will gain more muscle, but it isn't taking the place of your fat. (In fact, you breathe your fat out.) An easy trick to lose even more fat is to change your metabolic rate, and the only way to do that is to build more muscle mass, says our nutrition director Jaclyn London, MS, RD, CDN.
4. Feel happier.
If you're in a better mood after a hard workout, you're not alone: Exercising releases endorphins throughout your body, and puts you in a happier state of mind. Research suggests that resistance training might also help you feel less anxious and fight depression symptoms.
5. Protect against heart disease.
Having a reduced muscle mass — on top of aging and decreased physical activity — can put you at a higher risk of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular problems. Doing just a little bit of resistance training improves your bone health and in turn can lower your risk for cardiovascular diseases, which is why the American Heart Association lists strength training as one way to reduce the risk of heart disease.



culled from:goodhousekeeping.com


woman's back

The Basics

If the phrase "Ouch, my back!" is a regular part of your life, you're not alone: 65 million Americans suffer from low back pain. To feel better, try this routine from Gerard Girasole, MD, a spine surgeon, and Cara Hartman, CPT, authors of the book, The 7-Minute Back Pain Solution. Each of these stretches works your core muscles, which support your back. The stronger your core is, the more it protects your back from strain and pain. Do these stretches twice a day if you're having discomfort now, or once a day to help you avoid aches in the first place.






1. Hamstring Floor Stretch

What it works: The back of your thighs
A: Lie on your back with knees bent, feet flat on the floor and arms at your sides.
B: Place your hands (or a belt or towel) behind your right calf or thigh (whichever feels most comfortable and causes you to feel tension in your hamstring) and slowly raise your leg. Straighten it as much as you can until you feel the stretch in the back of your leg. (Keep your leg slightly bent if needed.) Hold for 30 seconds, then switch sides. Do twice with each leg.

 

2. Knee-to-Chest Stretch

What it works: Your Hips, buttocks, and lower back
A: Lie on your back with knees bent, feet flat on the floor and arms at your sides.
B: Contract your stomach muscles and bring your right knee up toward your chest, holding your shin with both hands. Try to straighten your left leg, but if you feel any tension in your back, leave it bent. Hold for 20 seconds, then return to start. Repeat stretch on the other leg.

 

3. Spine Stretch

What it works: Your lower back and sides of your lower back
A: Lie on your back with knees bent, feet flat on the floor and arms at your sides.
B: Contract your stomach muscles, and get into position by pulling your right knee to your chest with both hands and straightening out your left leg on the floor. Extend your right arm straight out on the floor and then, with your left hand, slowly bring your right knee over toward your left side. Turn your head toward your right side (look down your extended arm). Hold the stretch for 20 seconds. Make sure your head, arms and shoulders stay on the floor, and don't arch your back. Return both knees to the starting position. Repeat the stretch on the other side.


 

4. Glute Floor Stretch

What it works: Your buttocks
A: Lie on your back with knees bent, feet flat on the floor and arms at your sides.
B: Contract your stomach muscles and cross your right leg over your left, resting your right foot on your left knee. Then, grab your left thigh with both hands and bring both legs toward your body. Hold for 30 seconds, then return both legs to the starting position. Repeat on the other side.


 

5. Hip Flexor Stretch

What it works: Your hips and the front of your thighs
A: Start on your knees. Bring your left leg to a bent-knee position with your left foot flat on the floor and your right foot behind you. (If you have knee problems, put a pillow under your right knee.)
B: Place your right hand on your waist and your left hand on your left leg for support. Lean forward into your right hip while keeping your right knee on the floor. You should feel the stretch in the front of your right hip. Hold for 30 seconds, then switch sides and repeat.

 

6. Standing Thigh Stretch

What it works: The front of your thighs
A Stand next to a chair or table and hold on to it for balance with your left hand.
B Grasp the top of your right foot (or ankle, if that's easier) with your right hand, and gently pull your heel toward your butt. Make sure your right knee stays facing down and close to your left leg. Hold for 30 seconds, then switch sides and repeat.

 

7. Total Back Stretch

What it works: Your entire back, shoulders, and arms
Part 1: Stand facing a table or counter, a few feet away. Bend your knees slightly and grasp the edge. Your body should form an L shape, with arms straight and head level with shoulders. Hold for 10 seconds.
Then, start part 2:
A: Stand up straight, place your left hand in front of your body with your elbow bent.
B: Bend your right arm over your head as you lean your upper body gently to the left. Hold for 10 seconds, then switch sides and repeat.
 

Bonus: The Anytime Ab Squeeze

You can do this protect-your-back move from a standing, sitting, or lying position. The exercise trains your stomach muscles so they can instantly stabilize your spine during a sudden movement — a fall, for example — to help prevent an injury. It's also a great tummy toner!
A If you're on the floor or in bed, lie on your back. (If you're sitting, straighten up. If you're standing, start at step B.) Place your arms at your sides.
B Inhale, and as you exhale, slowly contract your stomach muscles. Hold the contraction for 5 to 10 seconds (but don't hold your breath — keep breathing!). Repeat 10 times.


 

Bonus: Turn on the Tunes

Music releases feel-good hormones and can also trigger emotional responses that dull your brain's ability to process pain. In fact, chronic pain sufferers reported a 21% drop in throbbing after seven days of tuning in to an hour of soothing songs, reports research in the Journal of Advanced Nursing. The more you like the song, the greater the benefit. Opt for music that calms you, then press play.

 

Bonus: Grab a Beach Ball

A fast fix for backaches may be hiding in your garage. Dust off your beach ball and use it as support whenever you plan to be sitting for long periods of time. Inflate the ball about halfway and place it behind your lower back, in the curve at waist level. When sitting with the ball in place, you should feel an imaginary vertical line tracing from your hips, through your shoulders, to the top of your head.